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Summer Program for Juniors (TASP) | Past Topics & Faculty

2013
Cornell I: Literature Takes on Moral Complexity
  Faculty: Kathleen Long and Marilyn Migiel, Cornell University
Cornell II: Times Square
  Faculty: Nat Hurley, University of Alberta; and Sara Warner, Cornell University
Michigan I: FOOD
   Faculty: Christian Stayner, University of Michigan; and Jason Goldman, Independent Scholar
Michgian II: Dark Phrases of Womanhood: Black Feminist Approaches to History and Literature
   Faculty: Tayana L. Hardin, Rutgers University; and Grace L. B. Sanders, University of Michigan

2012
Cornell I: Literature Takes on Moral Complexity
  Faculty: Kathleen Long and Marilyn Migiel, Cornell University
Cornell II: Democracy and Diversity
  Faculty: David Peritz, Sarah Lawrence College; and Angelia Means, Independent Scholar
Michigan I: The Origin of Species and the Politics of Evolution
  Faculty: Benjamin Gregg and David Prindle, The University of Texas at Austin
Michgian II: Modernism through Modern Art and Theater
  Faculty: Charles Grimes, University of North Carolina, Wilmington; and Justin Kim, Deep Springs College

2011
Cornell I: Intergenerational Justice
  Faculty: John Davidson and David Leitch, University of Oregon
Cornell II: Thinking Girls, Thinking Boys
  Faculty: Maria Fackler, Davidson College; and Nick Salvato, Cornell University
Michigan I: Freedom, Dialogue, and Polarization
  Faculty: Sharon Schuman, University of Oregon; and Joan Sitomer, University of Michigan
Michgian II: Visions of America from Abroad
  Faculty: Juan De Pascuale and Mortimer Guiney, Kenyon College

2010
Cornell I: Democracy and Diversity
  Faculty: Laura Donaldson, Cornell University; and David Peritz, Sarah Lawrence College
Cornell II: Gods and Heroes of the Celts and Vikings
  Faculty: Thomas Hill, Cornell University; and Charles Wright, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
UT Austin: Changing Minds, Winning Peace: Cultural and Public Diplomacy in Today’s World
  Faculty: William Glade; and Lawrence S. Graham, The University of Texas at Austin

2009
Cornell I: Pleasure and Danger: Bodies in History, Science, Literature and Philosophy
  Faculty: Masha Raskolnikov, Cornell University; and Gregory Tomso, University of West Florida
Cornell II: Empire of Prisons
 
Faculty: Tamar Carroll and Barry Maxwell, Cornell University
University of Michigan:
Physics, Philosophy, Fiction
  Faculty: Benjamin Paloff, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Katie Peterson, Deep Springs College
UT Austin: Documenting Reality: Producing and Reading the Literature of Fact
  Faculty: J.B. Colson and William Stott, The University of Texas at Austin

2008
Cornell I: Caribbean Dialogs [.com]
  Faculty: Petrine Archer-Straw, Cornell University; and Petrina Dacres, Edna Manley College for the Visual & Performing Arts
Cornell II: Human Rights, Cultural Rights & Economic Rights: Views from the “Global South”
 
Faculty: Johanna Schoss and Marina Welker, Cornell University
University of Michigan:
The Environment and our Health
  Faculty: Jerome Nriagu and Nil Basu, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
UT Austin: The History and Images of Hollywood’s Africa
  Faculty: James Wilson and Keith Robinson, The University of Texas at Austin

2007
Cornell I: International Politics on Film.
  Faculty:
Jonathan Kirshner and Matthew Evangelista, Cornell University.
Cornell II: The Renaissance Made Flesh: Conceptualizing the Early Modern Body.
  Faculty:
Kathleen Perry Long, Cornell University; and Dolora Chapelle Wojciehowski, The University of Texas at Austin.
Michigan: Race, Space, and the American Self.
  Faculty:
Justyna Pas and Magdalena Zaborowska, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
UT Austin: Science, Technology, and the Responsible Citizen.
  Faculty:
Lorenzo Alvisi and Irene Eibenstein-Alvisi, The University of Texas at Austin.
WashU-St. Louis Program: Exploring Metropolitan Landscapes: St. Louis as Classroom and Experiment.
  Faculty:
Robert George Hansman and Jodi Polzin, Washington University in St. Louis.


2006
Cornell I: Foreign Policy as Subversion.
  Faculty:
Tamara Loos and Raymond Craib, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Voyages to the Otherworld: Medieval Romance and Modern Adaptations.
  Faculty:
Thomas Hill, Cornell University; and Charles Wright, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
Michigan: Islam in Practice: Religion, Culture, and Politics.
  Faculty:
Alexander Knysh and Marcia Inhorn, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
UT Austin: The Cultures of Writing.
  Faculty:
Susan and Kurt Heinzelman, The University of Texas at Austin.
WashU-St. Louis Program: The Ties That Bind: Exploring the Connections and Absorbing the Lessons of the American Civil Rights Movement and the South African Anti-Apartheid Struggle.
  Faculty:
Robert Vinson and Leslie Brown, Washington University in St. Louis.

2005
Cornell I: Truth in History?
  Faculty:
Jeffrey Rusten, Cornell University; and Carolyn Dewald, Bard College.
Cornell II: War and Terror: Ethical, Legal, and Historical Perspectives.
  Faculty:
Matthew Evangelista and Peter Holquist, Cornell University.
Michigan: Music of the Everyday: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Popular Music in the U.S., 1880-Present.
  Faculty:
Mark Clague and Derek Vaillant, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
UT Austin: War, Violence, and Story-Making.
  Faculty:
Thomas Palaima, The University of Texas at Austin; and Stacey Peebles, The University of Houston.
WashU-St. Louis Program: The Transformation of Twentieth-Century American Cities.
  Faculty:
Eric Mumford and Margaret Garb, Washington University in St. Louis.

2004
Cornell I: He Said, She Said: The Battle of the Sexes in Medieval and Renaissance Writing.
  Faculty:
Marilyn Migiel and Kathleen Perry Long, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Pleasure and Danger: Bodies in History, Science, Literature, and Philosophy.
  Faculty:
Masha Raskolnikov, Cornell University; and Gregory Tomso, Ithaca College.
Michigan: Race, Gender, and Class in American and British History.
  Faculty:
Gina Morantz-Sanchez and Geoff Eley, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
UT Austin: The Invention of the Human: The Problem of the Modern Subject.
  Faculty:
Benjamin Gregg and David Edwards, The University of Texas at Austin.

2003
Cornell I: “Know Thyself”: Pride and Prejudice in Philosophy and Literature.
  Faculty:
Jennifer Whiting and Thomas Berry, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Fourth World, First Peoples: Indigenous Cultures in an Interconnected World.
  Faculty:
Laura Donaldson and Angela Gonzales, Cornell University.
Michigan: Islam in Practice: Religion, Culture, and Politics.
  Faculty:
Winchester Brown and Alexander Knysh, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
UT Austin: The Mystery of Creativity: On Literature and the Creative Process.
  Faculty:
Dolora Chapelle Wojciehowski and D’Arcy Randall, University of Texas at Austin.

2002
Cornell I: The Literature of Chivalry.
  Faculty:
Carol Kaske, Cornell University; and Michael Twomey, Ithaca College.
Cornell II: Racism, Power, and Privilege.
  Faculty:
Don Barr and James Turner, Cornell University.
Michigan: The American Century, Black Transnationalism, and Civil Rights.
  Faculty:
Penny von Eschen and Kevin Gaines, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

2001
Cornell I: Performing Gender: From Rap Lyrics to Lamentations.
  Faculty:
Sally McConnell-Ginet and Kathryn March, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Altered Consciousness: Writing about Poetry and Art.
  Faculty:
Gordon Teskey, Cornell University; and Charles Mahoney, University of Connecticut.
Michigan: Race, Gender, and Class in American and British History.
  Faculty:
Gina Morantz-Sanchez and Geoff Eley, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Penn State: The Roots, Evolution, Development, and Trajectory of Environmental Policy and Politics.
  Faculty:
Robert O'Connor and Richard Bord, Penn State University.

2000
Cornell I: Myth and Tragedy.
  Faculty:
Frederick Ahl and Jeffrey Rusten, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Constitutional Conflicts: American Debates on Liberty, Justice, and Democracy.
  Faculty:
Rhoda Rabkin, American Enterprise Institute; and Jeremy Rabkin, Cornell University.
Michigan: Us and Them: Perspectives on Crime, Violence, and Madness.
  Faculty:
Charles Bright and Jeffrey Evans, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Penn State: Poetic Powers.
  Faculty:
Don Bialostowky and Robin Schulze, Penn State University.

1999
Cornell I: Jews, Christians, and Muslims: Scriptures, Interpretive Traditions, and the Cultural Imagination.
  Faculty:
Ross Brann and Kim Haines-Eitzen, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Poets, Historians, and Other Liars.
  Faculty:
Lynne Abel and Judith Ginsburg, Cornell University.
Michigan: People in Movement.
  Faculty:
Janet Hart and David Frye, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

1998
Cornell I: Almost Human: Monstrous Forms and Identity Crises.
  Faculty:
Kathleen Perry Long and Debra Castillo, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Victorian Controversies.
  Faculty:
Sandra Siegel, Cornell University; and Joseph Bristow, UCLA.
Kenyon: Community, Individuality, Justice: Visions of Utopia and Anti-Utopia.
  Faculty:
Harry Clor and Roy Wortman, Kenyon College.
Michigan: Ethics, Asthetics, and Society.
  Faculty:
Stephen Darwall, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Daniel Jacobson, Ohio State University.

1997
Cornell I: Imagining Cities.
  Faculty:
Neil Hertz, Johns Hopkins University; and Pierre Clavel, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Varieties of American Dissent, 1670-1990.
  Faculty:
Nick Salvatore and Daniel Usner, Cornell University.
Kenyon: Hope Against Despair: The Crisis of Meaning in Contemporary Art, Literature, and Philosophy.
  Faculty:
Timothy Baker Shutt and Juan de Pascuale, Kenyon College.
St. John's: Language and Literature.
  Faculty:
John Verdi and Irena Datchev, St. John's College.

1996
Cornell I: Dissident Identities: Representations in Contemporary Anglo-American Cinema and Literature.
  Faculty:
Beverly Ballaro, Cornell University; and Giancarlo Lombardi, Smith College.
Cornell II: Native American Literature and America's Romance with the West.
  Faculty:
Kathryn Shanley and David Moore, Cornell University.
Kenyon: The Dilemma of Modernism: Art and Authority in the Modern World.
  Faculty:
Michael Brint and Michael Evans, Kenyon College.
St. John's: Understanding Society.
  Faculty:
Radoslav Datchev and Emily Brooker Langston, St. John's College.

1995
Cornell I: Geography, Literature, and Critical Social Theory.
  Faculty:
Shelley Sunn Wong and Barry Maxwell, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Gender and War in the Twentieth Century.
  Faculty:
Molly Hite, Cornell University; and Frank Costigliola, University of Rhode Island.
Kenyon: Liberal Democracy and the American Character.
  Faculty:
Fred Baumann and Harry Clor, Kenyon College.
St. John's: Ethics and Society in the Ancient(?) World.
  Faculty:
Eric Sageng and Judith Seeger, St. John's College.

1994
Cornell: Poetry and the Body Politic.
  Faculty:
Stephen Tapscott, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Thomas Stillinger, University of Chicago.
St. John's: Foundations of Modernity.
  Faculty:
Henry Higuera and Anita Kronsberg, St. John's College.

1993
Cornell I: Politics of Culture.
  Faculty:
Pat Gill, University of Virginia; and Thomas DiPiero, University of Rochester.
Cornell II: Citizen Participation: Images and Reality.
  Faculty:
Kathleen Frankovic, CBS News; and Davydd Greenwood, Cornell University.
Williams: Gender and Desire.
  Faculty:
Lynda Bundtzen and Jana Sawicki, Williams College.
St. John's: What is the Family? Literary Images and Philosophical Accounts.
  Faculty:
Michael Dink and Marilyn Higuera, St. John's College.

1992
Cornell I: Contemporary Fiction by Women.
  Faculty:
Biddy Martin, Cornell University; and Lisa Moore, University of Texas-Austin.
Cornell II: Passion and Excess: Sacrifice, Exchange, and Self-Representation.
  Faculty:
Jeffrey Nunokawa, Princeton University; and William Flesch, Brandeis University.
Williams: Memory and Community.
  Faculty:
William Darrow and Michael MacDonald, Williams College.
St. John's: Certainty and Doubt.
  Faculty:
Anita Kronsberg and Eric Salem, St. John's College.

1991
Cornell I: Poetry and Everyday Life.
  Faculty:
Debra Fried, Cornell University; and Karen Ford, Marquette University.
Cornell II: Language, Society, and Self.
  Faculty:
Barry Weller, University of Utah; and Clare Wolfowitz, American University.
St. John's: Seeing, Speaking, and Thinking.
  Faculty:
John White and Basia Miller, St. John's College.
Williams: Elitism: Economic and Philosophical Perspectives.
  Faculty:
Michael McPherson and Morton Owen Schapiro, Williams College.

1990
Cornell I: Gender, Race, and Nation: Questions of Identity in Modern Literature and Film.
  Faculty:
Sharon Willis, University of Rochester; and Jeffrey Nunokawa, Princeton University.
Cornell II: Difference and Democracy in the United States: Anthropology at the End of the "American Empire."
  Faculty:
Davydd Greenwood and Carol Greenhouse, Cornell University.
Deep Springs: Law, Virtue, and Self-Interest.
  Faculty:
David Schuman, University of Oregon; Sharon Schuman, Willamette University; and John Schaar, University of California, Santa Cruz.
St. John's: Science as Literature, Literature as Science.
  Faculty:
Deborah Renault and John Verdi, St. John's College.
Williams: Understanding Other People's Politics: Philosophy, Social Theory, and the Human Sciences.
  Faculty:
Raymond Baker and Alan White, Williams College.

1989
Cornell I: The Novel and Society.
  Faculty:
Michael Harper and Cheryl Walker, Scripps College.
Cornell II: The Representation of Difference: A Crisis in Contemporary America.
  Faculty:
Nancy Lutz, Cornell University; and Jacqueline Urla, University of California, Berkeley.
Deep Springs: Tradition and Autonomy.
  Faculty:
Hanna Pitkin, University of California, Berkeley; John Schaar, University of California, Santa Cruz; and Sara Shumer, Haverford College.
Williams: The Psychology of Social Influence: The Individual in Modern Society.
  Faculty:
George Goethals and Saul Kassin, Williams College.

1988
Cornell I: Crossing Cultures and Multiplying Times.
  Faculty:
James Boon and Carol Greenhouse, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Paradise, the Garden, and City Dreams.
  Faculty:
Leonard Mirin, Cornell University; and Betsy Cann, Miami University.
Deep Springs: Law, Literature, and Society: American and American Indian.
  Faculty:
Robert Clinton, University of Iowa; Michael Delacorte, University of California, Davis; and Robert Sayre, University of Iowa.
Williams: The Great Transformation: The Making of Modern Industrial Society--England and America.
  Faculty:
James Wood and Robert Dalzell, Williams College.

1987
Cornell I: Morality and Persons.
  Faculty:
George Harris and Paul Hughes, College of William and Mary.
Cornell II: Culture and Miscommunication.
  Faculty:
Ruth Borker, University of California, Berkeley; and Donald Brenneis, Pitzer College.
Chicago: The Individual and Community.
  Faculty:
Herman Sinaiko and Sheila Sullivan, University of Chicago.
Deep Springs: History and Prospects of the Liberal Ideal.
  Faculty:
Barbara Herman, University of Southern California; and Miles Morgan, Oakwood School and Occidental College.
Williams: Public Man, Private Woman.
  Faculty:
Rosemarie Tong and Lynda Bundtzen, Williams College.

1986
Cornell I: Cinema and Modernity.
  Faculty:
P. Adams Sitney, Princeton University; and Richard Klein, Cornell University.
Cornell II: The American Reaction to War in the Twentieth Century.
  Faculty:
J. Garry Clifford and John Rourke, University of Connecticut.
Chicago: Science and Society: Knowledge, Morals, and Power.
  Faculty:
Amy Kass and Leon Kass, M.D., University of Chicago.
Deep Springs: Democracy and Authority.
  Faculty:
John Schaar, University of California, Santa Cruz; and Sara Shumer, Haverford College.
Williams: Art and Mystery.
  Faculty:
Lawrence Graver and Lawrence Raab, Williams College.

1985
Cornell I: Reading/Writing American Poetry.
  Faculty:
Barry Weller, University of Utah; and David Baker, Denison University.
Cornell II: American Political Thought: The State and Moral Life.
  Faculty:
Harry Clor and Fred Baumann, Kenyon College.
Deep Springs: Philosophical Perspectives on the Individual and Society.
  Faculty:
Barbara Herman, University of Southern California; and Miles Morgan, Oakwood School and Occidental College.
Williams: The Business of America.
  Faculty:
Robert Dalzell and Roger Bolton, Williams College.

1984
Cornell I: The Novel and Society.
  Faculty:
Harry Shaw, Cornell University; and Michael Harper, Scripps College.
Cornell II: The Public Interest and Factions in American Government.
  Faculty:
Patricia Leeds and Werner Dannhauser, Cornell University.
Deep Springs: Culture and Creativity.
  Faculty:
Elizabeth Coville and Van Dusenbery, University of Chicago; George Newtown, Deep Springs College; and James Smith, California State University, Fresno.
Williams: Technology, the Environment, and Human Society.
  Faculty:
William Moomaw and Thomas Jorling, Williams College.

1983
Cornell I: Representations in Literature and the Visual Arts.
  Faculty:
Giuseppe Mazzotta and Esther Dotson, Cornell University.
Cornell II: The American Reaction to War in the Twentieth Century.
  Faculty:
J. Garry Clifford and Richard Hiskes, University of Connecticut, Storrs.
Deep Springs: Work and Community.
  Faculty:
Jeff Lustig, Humboldt State University; and George Newtown, Deep Springs College.
Williams: From Camelot to Watergate: American Culture, 1960-1974.
  Faculty:
Michael Bell and Peter Berek, Williams College.

1982
Cornell I: Homer, Vergil, and Dante: Cities of the Spirit in the Great Epics.
  Faculty:
Barry Weller, University of Utah; and Alex Gold, Harvard University.
Cornell II: Social Theory and Historiography: the Case of Modern England.
  Faculty:
Clive Holmes, Cornell University; and Susan Amussen, Brown University.
Deep Springs: Community and Authority.
  Faculty:
Tim Hunt and Merrill Hunt, Deep Springs College; and Richard Krouse, Williams College.
Williams: Human Thought and Artificial Intelligence.
  Faculty:
Neil Grabois and Charles Karelis, Williams College.

1981
Cornell I: The Ways of Narrative--From Classical to Modern Fiction.
  Faculty:
W.R. Johnson and Giuseppe Mazzotta, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Peasants: Politics, Permanence, and Protest.
  Faculty:
David Goldey and Patricia Goldey, Oxford University.
Deep Springs: Science and Human Values.
  Faculty:
John Schaar, University of California, Berkeley; Brandt Kehoe, California State University, Fresno; and David and Sharon Schuman, Deep Springs College.

1980
Cornell I: Reading About a Revolution.
  Faculty:
Henry Abelove, Wesleyan University; and Neil Hertz, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Nature and Culture/Biology and Society.
  Faculty:
June Fessenden-Raden and Davydd Greenwood, Cornell University.
Deep Springs: The Work Process and Problems of Community and Authority.
  Faculty:
Jeff Lustig, University of California, Berkeley; and David and Sharon Schuman, Deep Springs College.
Johns Hopkins: American Cities: Decline or Regeneration?
  Faculty:
Henry Henderson, Hopkins Metrocenter; Katherine Lyall, HUD; and others.

1979
Cornell I: The World Seen: Perception and the Visual Arts.
  Faculty:
David Cast, Yale University; and Jacqueline Falkenheim, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Liberal Democracy and its Problems.
  Faculty:
Harry Clor and Richard Melanson, Kenyon College.
Deep Springs: Problems of Community and Authority.
  Faculty:
John Schaar, University of California, Santa Cruz; and David and Sharon Schuman, Deep Springs College.
Johns Hopkins: American Cities: Decline or Regeneration?
  Faculty:
Henry Henderson, Hopkins Metrocenter; Katherine Lyall, HUD; and others.

1978
Cornell: Self and Society: Challenges to Liberal Thought.
  Faculty:
Barbara Herman and Miles Morgan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Deep Springs: The American Political System: Styles of Challenge and Response.
  Faculty:
Shaw Livermore and Richard Hogan, University of Michigan; and David and Sharon Schuman, Deep Springs College.
Johns Hopkins: The American City: Issues of Decay or Prosperity?
  Faculty:
Jack Fisher, Robert Hearn, Stephen Gottfredson, and Henry Henderson, Hopkins Metrocenter; and Katherine Lyall, HUD.

1977
Cornell I: The Lyric Tradition in Poetry.
  Faculty:
Ralph Johnson, Cornell University; and Francoise Meltzer, University of Chicago.
Cornell II: Problems of Judging Right and Wrong: Ethical Absolutism and Ethical Relativism.
  Faculty:
Norman Kretzmann and Eleanore Stump, Cornell University.

1976
Cornell I: The Making of Critical Readers.
  Faculty:
Nellie Furman and Sally McConnell-Ginet, Cornell University.
Cornell II: American Foreign Policy: A Historical Perspective.
  Faculty:
Thomas Paterson and Gary Clifford, University of Connecticut.

1975
Cornell I: The Ancient Art of Subversive Writing.
  Faculty:
Frederick Ahl, Cornell University; and Douglass Parker, University of Texas.
Cornell II: American Democracy and the American Purpose.
  Faculty:
Harry Clor and John Agresto, Kenyon College.
Cremona: Environmental Decision-Making.
  Faculty:
Henry Scott, California Institute of the Arts; and others.

1974
Cornell I: Poetry and Wisdom in Shakespeare.
  Faculty:
Ernest Fortin and David Lowenthal, Boston College.
Cornell II: American Foreign Policy as History: The 20th Century.
  Faculty:
Thomas Paterson and J. Garry Clifford, University of Connecticut.
Cremona: Public Policy and Ecology.
  Faculty:
Carlos Stern, University of Connecticut.

1973
Cornell I: Society and the Novel.
  Faculty:
Edward O'Callahan and Winthrop Wetherbee, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Democracy in America.
  Faculty:
Glen Thurow, State University of New York, Buffalo.
Cremona: Public Policy and the Environment.
  Faculty:
Carlos Stern, University of Connecticut; and others.
Deep Springs: The Idea of Community.
  Faculty:
Dean Randall Reid, Deep Springs College; and others.

1972
Cornell I: The Art of Fiction.
  Faculty:
Daniel Schwarz and John Boyd, Cornell University.
Cornell II: The Impact of the United States on the Third World.
  Faculty:
Thomas McCormick, University of Wisconsin; and Harold Sims, University of Pittsburgh.
Deep Springs: Community and the American Experience.
  Faculty:
Dean Randall Reid, Deep Springs College; and John Schaar, University of California, Santa Cruz.

1971
Cornell I: The Experience of the Writer.
  Faculty:
Neil Hertz and Reeve Parker, Cornell University.
Cornell II: The Founding of the American Republic.
  Faculty:
Martin Diamond, Claremont College; and Ann Stuart Diamond.
Deep Springs: The Idea of Community.
  Faculty:
John Schaar, University of California, Santa Cruz; and Dean Randall Reid, Deep Springs College.

1970
Cornell I: The Nature of Violence.
  Faculty:
Stephen Jones, Cornell University; and David Schneider, Amherst College.
Cornell II: Shakespeare and Modern Drama.
  Faculty:
Thomas Greene, Yale University; and John Erwin, Brown University.
Deep Springs: The Idea of Community.
  Faculty:
John Schaar, University of California, Santa Cruz; and Dean Randall Reid, Deep Springs College.
Hampton: The Legacy of American Slavery.
  Faculty:
James Banner, Princeton University; and Lois Banner, Rutgers University.

1969
Cornell I: Politics, Language, and Literature.
  Faculty:
Scott McMillin and Douglas Archibald, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Historical Patterns of Scientific Development.
  Faculty:
Michael Mahoney, Princeton University; and Sigalia Dostrovsky Cannon.
Deep Springs: Poverty and Race in America.
  Faculty:
Christopher Breiseth, Williams College; and Michael Davidson, NAACP Legal Defense Fund.
Hampton: From Slavery Toward Freedom: An American Political Problem.
  Faculty:
John Martin, Cornell University; Sandra Levy, University of Chicago; John Whitehead, Yale University; and Robert Dawidoff.

1968
Cornell I: The Genesis of Modern Science.
  Faculty:
Theodore Brown, Princeton University.
Cornell II: Drama and the Arts: From the Baroque to Classicism.
  Faculty:
Alain Seznec and Peter Kahn, Cornell University.
Hampton: From Slavery to Freedom: An American Political Problem.
  Faculty:
Robert Faulkner and Charles Fish, Princeton University.

1967
Cornell I: Historical Studies in the Origins of War.
  Faculty:
Donald Kagan, Cornell University; and Walter Ralls, Hobart College.
Cornell II: The Reading of Literature.
  Faculty:
Neil Hertz, Cornell University; and Taylor Stoehr, State University of New York, Buffalo.
Hampton: From Slavery to Freedom: An American Political Problem.
  Faculty:
Herbert Storing, University of Chicago; Peter Henriot, Seattle University; and Charles Umbanhowar, University of Chicago.

1966
Cornell I: The Politics of Protest Since World War II.
  Faculty:
David Goldey and Roderick Martin, Oxford University.
Cornell II: Drama: Ancient and Modern.
  Faculty:
Thomas Greene and Cyrus Hamlin, Yale University.
Hampton: The South in Historical Perspective.
  Faculty:
Ray Ginger, Brandeis University; Harald Bakken, Harvard University; and David Levine, University of Chicago.
Princeton: Revolutions in Science.
  Faculty:
Michael Mahoney and C. Stewart Gilmore, Princeton University.

Note: Exact seminar titles do not always exist for the years 1954-65
.

1965
Cornell I: Religious Experience and Philosophical Inquiry.
  Faculty:
Nelson Pike, Cornell University; and William Rowe, Purdue University.
Cornell II: American and Roman Civilization in Expansion: A Comparison.
  Faculty:
Donald Kagan and Walter LaFeber, Cornell University.
Princeton: Philosophical Conceptions of Liberty.
  Faculty:
Robert Nozick and Miles Morgan, Princeton University.

1964
Cornell I: Literary and Philosophical Aspects of Greek Civilization.
  Faculty:
Thomas Greene and Adam Parry, Yale University.
Cornell II: The Experience of Literary and Dramatic Art.
  Faculty:
David Grossvogel and Neil Hertz, Cornell University.
Princeton: Exploring the Bill of Rights.
  Faculty:
Shaw Livermore, University of Michigan; and Keith Gunderson, Princeton University.

1963
Cornell I: Exploring Greek Civilization.
  Faculty:
Stuart Brown, Cornell University; and Thomas Gould, Amherst College.
Cornell II: The Novel in England and America.
  Faculty:
Richard Ohmann, Wesleyan University; and Paul Smith, Trinity College.
Princeton: Exploring the Bill of Rights.
  Faculty:
James Ward Smith and Shaw Livermore, Princeton University.

1962
Cornell I: Form, Method, and Expression: The Arts in Our Time.
  Faculty:
James McConkey and Peter Kahn, Cornell University.
Cornell II: Exploring the Bill of Rights.
  Faculty:
Shaw Livermore, Princeton University; and Julian Franklin, Cornell University.
Stanford: Exploring the Greek Polis.
  Faculty:
Reginald Arragon, Reed College; and William Alderson.

1961
Cornell: Labor in America.
  Faculty:
Arthur Kruger, University of Pennsylvania; and Gilles Beausoleil, Toronto University.
Stanford: Ethnic Groups and American Life.
  Faculty:
Morton Keller, University of Pennsylvania; and Patrick Hazard, University of Hawaii.

1960
Cornell: The Bill of Rights.
  Faculty:
James W. Smith and Shaw Livermore, Princeton University.
Deep Springs: The Character and Goals of the American Economy.
  Faculty:
Lloyd Fallers, University of California, Berkeley; and Simon Whitney, Federal Trade Commission.

1959
Cornell: The School Segregation Dilemma.
  Faculty:
Harvey Mansfield, Ohio State University; and Robert McClure, University of Minnesota.
Deep Springs: Individual Liberties in the Nuclear Age.
  Faculty:
Justice Thomas Fairchild, Wisconsin State Supreme Court; and Judd Harmon, Utah State University.

1958
Cornell: The Bill of Rights.
  Faculty:
James W. Smith, Princeton University; and James Morton Smith.
Deep Springs: Science and Human Values.
  Faculty:
Erik Pell, General Electric Company; Konrad Krauskopf, Stanford University; and Justice Thomas Fairchild, Wisconsin State Supreme Court.

1957
Deep Springs: The Impact of Prosperity and Depression on American Democracy.
  Faculty:
Charles Brickley, the Putney School; John Mellor, Cornell University; and Neil Wood, University of California, Berkeley.

1956
Cornell: Conflicting Ideals of Communism and Democracy.
  Faculty:
Charles Brickley, the Putney School; George Austin Malley, Cornell University; and Richard Loomis.

1955
Cornell: Theories and Practices of Government in the United States.
  Faculty:
Charles Brickley, the Putney School; Elmer Sprague, Brooklyn College; and John Mellor, Cornell University.

1954
Cornell: Emergence of Leadership in a Democratic Society; and Communication of Thought Through Language.
  Faculty:
Irwin Guernsey, Clifton Philipps, and Richard Loomis.

Telluride Association — 100 Years & Growing